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Home » Your Eye Health

Your Eye Health

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  • Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that's easily corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses and on some occasions, surgery.
  • Commonly called "lazy eye", amblyopia can be treated successfully if detected early enough in childhood.
  • Vision is arguably the most important of the five senses; it plays a crucial role throughout childhood and beyond. Yet many parents don't understand how vision helps their children develop appropriately. Use these articles to proactively care for your child’s eyes, spot potential trouble, and maximize the opportunity for crisp, convenient and healthy vision.
  • If you are over 40, already wear glasses, and your "arms aren't long enough" to read a newspaper, it's time for multifocal lenses.
  • Cataracts are a common cause of vision loss after age 55. Surgical correction is safe and effective, and offers several new options for better vision.
  • "One-size-fits-all" doesn't apply when it comes to eyewear. The best eyeglass lens solutions for work and play are those tailored specifically to your vision needs.
  • Today there are more convenient and healthy contact lens choices than ever before. Whatever your vision challenge, it can probably be met with an array of specialty contact lenses for individual vision needs.
  • Whether or not you require vision correction, sunglasses can add an element of comfort and enhanced performance to your activities, while helping you look great.
  • Seeing clearly is just one part of your overall eye health. It’s important to have regular eye exams whether or not you wear glasses or contacts, and even if your vision is sharp. The articles below explain what problems can be spotted with an eye exam, what’s involved in a comprehensive exam, and special considerations for kids and contacts.
  • There is no need to advertise your age with bifocals or trifocals-choose progressive lenses.
  • People with serious vision problems from an eye injury or disease affecting the front surface of the eye can often regain vision with a cornea transplant.
  • Tired of wearing glasses or contact lenses? Today, several surgical methods can correct your eyesight and, in most cases, give you the freedom of seeing well without corrective lenses.
  • Red, swollen eyelids and crusty debris at the base of your eyelashes are signs you may have blepharitis.
  • All about reading glasses, including why custom-made readers are superior to the pre-made variety from the drugstore.
  • The macula is the portion of the retina which provides sharp, central vision, and is involved in processing the fine details of the image. The breakdown of the macula is a disease called macular degeneration.
  • According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, 95% of those with diabetic retinopathy can avoid substantial vision loss if they are treated in time.
  • AIDS or other diseases that affect your immune system can increase your risk of serious eye problems from cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.
  • If undetected or uncontrolled with medication, diabetes can cause serious vision loss, even blindness.
  • The risk for dry eye increases with age, especially for women.
  • The struggle between fashion and function is officially declared a tie! Never before have eyeglass frames been offered in so many stylish choices. Yet, you'll be amazed at how many options are at your fingertips to help you see well, and protect your vision.
  • Eye problems can range from mild to severe; some are chronic, while others may resolve on their own, never to appear again. The articles below will give you a basic understanding of some of these problems and their implications. The cardinal rule is if your eyes don't look good, feel good or see well, you should visit your doctor.
  • Floaters are usually normal and harmless. But if you notice a sudden increase in floaters or floaters accompanied by flashes of light, see your eye doctor immediately.
  • If you are among the 85 million Baby Boomers in the United States and Canada (born between 1946 and 1964), you've probably noticed your eyes have changed. Most notably, presbyopia - the normal, age-related loss of near focusing ability - usually becomes a problem in our 40's, requiring new vision correction solutions. Learn about measures you can take to keep seeing clearly for years to come.
  • Glaucoma is a variety of disorders in the eye that can lead to loss of vision and even blindness. The most common type of glaucoma is caused by a gradual and painless rise of pressure inside the eye.
  • Also called farsightedness, hyperopia is a common vision problem that can cause headaches, eyestrain and trouble reading.
  • This eye disease causes the cornea to grow thinner and bulge forward in an irregular cone-shape. Treatment options range from gas permeable contact lenses to a cornea transplant.
  • This age-related problem is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Americans age 65 and older.
  • Just as our physical strength decreases with age, our eyes also exhibit an age-related decline in performance - particularly as we reach our 60's and beyond. Some age-related eye changes are perfectly normal, but others may signal a disease process. It's important to recognize signs and symptoms, and perhaps even more important to mitigate the effects of aging with some simple and common-sense strategies.
  • Also called nearsightedness, myopia is a very common vision problem, affecting up to one-third of the U.S. population.
  • Sports eyewear can give you the performance edge you're seeking for just about any sport. But make sure you get the eye protection you need as well. And after you're fit for the right eyewear, you might want to take your game up a notch with the same kind of vision training used by professional athletes.
  • Are you bothered by red, itchy eyes? You may have allergies.
  • Pingueculae and pterygia are funny-looking words for growths on the surface of your eye.
  • Low vision is the term used to describe reduced eyesight that cannot be fully corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or eye surgery. The primary causes of low vision are eye diseases, but low vision also can be inherited or caused by an eye or brain injury.
  • “Floaters” are usually normal and harmless. But if you notice a sudden increase in floaters or floaters accompanied by flashes of light, see your eye doctor immediately.
  • This acute and contagious form of conjunctivitis is particularly common among preschoolers and school-age children.
  • Ptosis is a drooping eyelid. Surgery is usually required to correct this problem.
  • A detached retina is a medical emergency. Learn the warning signs of a retinal detachment and what you can do to avoid permanent vision loss.
  • Also called nearsightedness, myopia is a very common vision problem, affecting up to one-third of the U.S. population.
  • These inherited disorders, commonly abbreviated as RP, cause progressive peripheral vision loss, night blindness and central vision loss.
  • You’ve heard of high blood pressure, but what about high eye pressure?
  • This common problem is simply an infected lid gland. Learn how to prevent and treat styes.
  • This inflammatory eye disease can cause permanent vision loss if not promptly treated.

Directions To:

Durham
Southpoint Mall

Fayetteville
Cross Creek Mall

Burlington
New Alamance Crossings Shopping Center

Wilmington
Westfield Independence Mall

Raleigh
The Circle at North Hills

Cary
Cary Towne Center